We Serve the Greater Merrimack Valley Area

Keyrenter Merrimack Valley has proven to be successful time and time again, which is why we are eager to expand in order to offer our services wherever we can.

We know our strategy works, and we hope each one of our customers can experience that strategy firsthand.

By realizing that each person and property has unique needs, Keyrenter is able to find the right tenants, perform proper maintenance, and much more so you can reap the benefits you deserve.

We currently provide our services to select areas in the Merrimack Valley area but may expand to others down the road.

Cities We Serve

Andover
Andover, in Essex County, dates back to 1646, has a population of about 33,000, and is also part of the Boston-Cambridge, MA – NH Metro region. The community is named after a town in England and is a charming example of a New England small town.

School System

Many people move to this community because of its excellent public school system. There is a 13 to 1 student-teacher ratio with 6,076 students in grades K-12 across 9 elementary and middle schools and one high school. The activities and clubs, teachers and academic consistently have A ratings. The public-school students score 62 percent higher than national score averages as well as higher than state averages. The high school has a 97 percent rating in academic quality.

Transportation

The town is situated at the intersection of Interstates 495 and 93, providing a short drive to towns in southern New Hampshire and the Boston area. Andover has its own Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority (MBTA) commuter rail line station which connects the community with downtown Boston’s North Station, a short 40-minute ride for commuters. Lawrence Municipal Airport is within a few minutes’ drive and both Manchester-Boston Regional Airport and Logan International Airport are 30 miles away.

Housing Options

The median household income is $118,324. Average family incomes are $144,685. Per capita income for the town is approximately $53,378. The median value of homes has risen more than five percent per annum in recent years, reflecting average Massachusetts increases, averaging $605,800. Average square foot prices are $284, higher than the average of $263 in Boston. Median home prices average $649,900 and average prices of homes sold are $450,300. The overall crime rate is 65 percent lower than the MA average and 76 percent lower than national average.

History, Community, and Recreation

Andover features several historic landmarks. The Ballardvale neighborhood is named after Joseph Ballard, who had a role in the 1692 Salem Witch Trials. During this time, more than 40 local Andover residents were accused of witchcraft.

Andover was also heavily involved in the abolitionist movement before and during the Civil War. “Uncle Tom’s Cabin’s author, Harriet Beecher Stowe, lived in a house on the Phillips Academy grounds that is now known as the Stowe House. The American Woolen Company opened a textile mill during the Industrial Revolution in Shawsheen Village, which was once known as Frye Village. William Wood, who owned the company, was an early visionary in the idea of planned communities.

The Shawsheen Village Historic District was part of Wood’s vision. Scottish immigrants made up much of the company’s workforce, reflected in some of the neighborhood’s street names. Shawsheen Village received its listing on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979. Additionally, The Andona Society was established in 1952 and provides scholarships for local students. One of the largest is Clown Town, offering a carnival and raising about $35,000 every year to benefit local children.

For a comprehensive market analysis of your rental property, please contact us today.

Billerica
Located in Middlesex County, approximately 20 miles north-northwest of Boston, Billerica was first settled in 1652 and is one of the oldest communities in the country. It borrows its name from the town of Billericay in Essex, England. Billerica is home to a diverse population of more than 40,000 residents and has been recognized as one of America’s best places to live. The growing economy and quality of life are drawing families and young professionals to this attractive community.

School System

Billerica offers a highly regarded public school system that consistently places high in state rankings. The school system serves a total of 3,500 elementary school students and offers 6 elementary schools and 2 middle schools. Billerica Memorial HS teaches 1,634 students.

Transportation

Situated along U.S. Route 3 (Northern Expressway) the community is less than 2 miles south of Interstate 495. It is also less than 3 miles north of the Route 128/I-95 High-Technology Corridor. Most residents have between a 20- and 40-minute commute to work. Billerica has its own Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority (MBTA) commuter rail line station which serves the Lowell Line and connects the community with downtown Boston’ North Station, a short 40-minute ride for commuters.

Housing Options

Boasting a wide range of housing options, Billerica is a popular suburban location for first-time homebuyers as well as people who want to rent. 80 percent of residents own their own home, with l 20 percent of town residents renting. The community has a median home value of $432,600. Those looking to lease an apartment can expect to pay close to $2,400 per month for a two-bedroom unit. Many homes have been built within the past 20 years. There are several options from which to choose that match your budget and lifestyle. You can select from historic homes, townhouses and modern low-rise apartments in neighborhoods and hamlets like Pinehurst, Rio Vista and Riverdale. This makes it easy to find a place where you will be comfortable.

The city boasts a young, educated workforce that earns a median household income well above the state and national averages. The unemployment rate is lower than the state and national averages. In addition to positions in the local government and school system, residents work in the defense, biomedical and transportation industries. Several high-technology research and development companies have offices in the community.

History, Community, and Recreation

Along with being listed as one of the country’s safest cities, the community is also highly regarded as a top town for sports and recreation. The community features a selection of quaint, locally owned shops and restaurants, as well as several national chains. Located on the Shawsheen and Concord rivers, the town is home to Nuttings Lake, which has a small public beach. These local waterways offer canoeing, sailing and other aquatic activities. Along with a public golf course, the community boasts several parks that feature playgrounds and scenic hiking trails. Manning State Park is equipped with sprinkler features for children, and the rustic Billerica State Forest has multiuse, wooded trails that afford wildlife viewing. Vietnam Veterans Park contains a dirt track for motocross bikes.

The community is home to numerous historic homes, mills and other structures. While the Town Common District preserves Colonial-era buildings like the town hall and two 19th-century churches, the Historic Mills District chronicles the community’s industrial past. Historic residences include the Dutton-Holden Homestead, the Deacon Samuel Hill House and Manning Manse, one of the town’s oldest structures. A museum in the Faulkner Mills is dedicated to the Middlesex Canal. Water-filled portions of this historic waterway, one of the first engineering feats of its kind in the country, can be seen within the town limits.

The Yankee Doodle Homecoming Weekend is a town wide festival commemorating native-son and patriot Thomas Ditson who many believe is the central figure in the historic song. Held in mid-September, the weekend event includes Colonial military reenactments as well a bike and dolly parade.

For a comprehensive market analysis of your rental property, please contact us today.

Chelmsford
Declared by “Money” magazine in 2011 as the 28th best place to live in the United States, Chelmsford offers great schools, convenient access to Boston, extremely low crime, and plenty of history. Nestled in northeast Massachusetts 24 miles northwest of Boston, the Middlesex County town of Chelmsford is home to 34,000 and is a suburb of the Lowell metropolitan area. The town was incorporated in May 1655 by an act of the Massachusetts General Court. When Chelmsford was incorporated, its local economy was fueled by lumber mills, limestone quarries and kilns. Over the next decades it would go on to become one of the first large-scale factory towns in the United States because of its early role in the country’s Industrial Revolution. First settled in 1652 and incorporated in 1655, the city is one of the oldest and most historic communities in Massachusetts and celebrated its 350th anniversary in 2005.

School System

Chelmsford Public Schools serves its 5,000 students in 4 elementary schools, 2 middle schools and one high school. The high school has a 14:1 student–teacher ratio and consistently out performs state averages in standardized tests.

Transportation

Chelmsford sits at the crossroads of I-495 and Rte. 3 (Northern Expressway) providing convenient access to the 128/I-95 tech corridor, downtown Boston, the North Shore, and New Hampshire. In addition, Chelmsford commuters are minutes from both the Lowell and Billerica MBTA stations, making for a convenient and short ride in to Boston.

Housing Options

Housing prices in this area are surprisingly reasonable and make it an attractive community in which to live. The latest US Census Bureau reports the median home value from 2012-2016 to be $357,200 and puts the price per square foot at $264. Median household income from the same period was reported to be $102,160 with an average per capita income of $47,124. US Census also reported 50.8% of residents had a bachelor’s degree or higher and 95.9% had earned a high school diploma or higher. Mean travel time to work is approximately 30 minutes. Average monthly rent in the area is $2400 for a three-bedroom, two bath home.

History, Community, and Recreation

Named for the town of Chelmsford, England, the militia of Chelmsford, Massachusetts was present during the Battle of Lexington and Concord, beginning the American Revolutionary War, and later fought at the Battle of Bunker Hill. Agriculture remained the dominant economic producer until the advancement of manufacturing technology made the community a profitable production hub. The early 19th-century industrial boom was fueled by the 1803 opening of the Middlesex Canal connecting Lowell to Boston, along with the opening of a granite quarry and a glass works. An integral part of the American Industrial Revolution, it was one of the first towns to host large manufacturing facilities including a wool mill, a yarn factory and the first producer of sulfur matches in the United States.

The Historic District boasts Greek Revival architecture and is located in the heart of the town. Added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980, the Historic District was once the center of area commerce and is still the political heart of town. Built in 1853, North Town Hall was the second of two buildings housing the head governmental office of the town. From 1967 until 2011, it was used as administrative space for the local schools. The building on Princeton Street has been completely restored and is now used as a community meeting place. North Town Hall was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2015.

Whether you enjoy nature or nightlife, you will always find something to do around town. The Bruce Freeman Rail Trail is a scenic trail built upon an old railroad line and extends from Lowell to Westford. Only non-motorized transportation is allowed on the trail and is perfect for joggers, hikers, bikers, parents walking with strollers and even skiers in winter. For those with furry friends, the dog park located on Richardson Road in the city’s northern section not only provides a friendly area where Fido can run but also hosts special events throughout the year. The dog park association provides educational resources for dog owners and promotes dog health, welfare, and humane treatment.

Mrs. Nelson’s Candy Shop has been a town landmark since 1954 and is still going strong. They create quality, handmade chocolate, peanut brittle and saltwater taffy every day at their shop on Chelmsford Street.

A New England town 30 miles from the Atlantic is expected to have a good selection of fresh seafood, and this town does not disappoint. Other restaurant fares in the area run the gamut from Indian to Mexican, and Thai to Greek. There are also great establishments with American eats and a bar and grill atmosphere. After dinner, enjoy a nightcap at one of the local pubs or catch the game with friends at the local sports bar. For the java connoisseur, several popular coffee houses will satisfy your caffeine craving.

For a comprehensive market analysis of your rental property, please contact us today.

Lawrence
Lawrence, Massachusetts is a successful industry city located in Essex County. Based in the northeastern area of Massachusetts and is only 25 miles from Boston. It covers roughly seven-and-a-half square miles of land – of which there are plentiful business opportunities. The town’s flourishing history of industry and labor give partial credit to its success. Beginning as America’s first planned manufacturing center and an engine of the American Industrial Revolution, the effects of its past still generate prosperous results to this day.

There are some 5,500 businesses in Lawrence. The economy draws from its industrial roots for its modern successes in commerce. In 2012 there were an impressive 6,000 retail sales conducted per person. That same year, merchant wholesalers oversaw nearly 900,000 sales.

In modern times, the town still serves as a plaza of diverse companies and firms. A portion of its economy is still focused on manufacturing. Excel Electronics and Tri-K Industries Inc. are some examples of the contemporary producers here. There are many career possibilities in the area; in fact, by 2015 there were thirty-four-thousand [34,000] employees with the most popular jobs being in production. Other prominent jobs were administrative and sales positions, as well as food and customer service.
For healthcare, the Massachusetts town offers a General Hospital complete with an emergency department.

Schools

Lawrence Public Schools (LPS) system manages 17 K-8 elementary schools. Lawrence High School established in 1901 serves 3,200 students. In addition, the Greater Lawrence Vocational School provides alternative career paths for students. Conductor and composer Leonard Bernstein and Pulitzer Prize poet Robert Frost both graduated from the Lawrence School system.

Transportation

I-495 runs along Lawrence’s south and eastern borders, while I-93 runs north- south just west of the city’s western border, providing easy access to Boston, New Hampshire, Northshore towns, and technology corridors along 128 and 1-495. Lawrence has its own Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority (MBTA) commuter rail line station, the McGovern Transportation Center, which serves the Haverhill Line and connects the community with downtown Boston’s North Station, a short 40-minute ride for commuters. MBTA bus service also serves Lawrence and local towns.

Housing Options

As of 2017, the population was an estimated 80,200 people, making the number of individuals per square mile about 11,030. Thirty-nine (39) percent of these persons were born outside of the country accounting for Lawrence’s designation as a Gateway City. Most households in the vicinity make an average yearly income of $37,000. With approximately 28,000 houses and apartments, the median price to buy is $230,000. Rent is usually above $1,000. Units here are commonly three-bedroom, two bathroom and up; many showcase eight- or nine-bedrooms scattered amongst a few stories, with an appropriate number of restrooms.

History, Community, and Recreation

Construction of the city began in the 1840s, and it wasn’t until 1853 that the city was completed and established. A few decades later there was a flood of immigrants to the territory from several different European nations. In turn, this provided the town with substantial labor to promote more business. This continued on into the early 1900s, earning the nickname “Immigrant City”. Due to this influx of newcomers in the nineteenth 19th and 20th centuries, there has been a diverse mix of cultures. As a result, there is presently a sizeable Hispanic influence.

Recreation is not scarce here; the Community Boating Program in place lets citizens of all ages sail out on the Merrimack River close to town. Lawrence Heritage State Park stretches an impressive 23 acres close to the river and displays a wonderful presentation of the city’s labor-filled past. Den Rock Park provides excellent hiking trails, while the Great Stone Dam is one of Lawrence’s often ignored beauties.

The Essex Art Center provides beautiful exhibits gathered from miles around. In addition, the Essex community hosts various festivals that celebrate past and present culture. For example, The African Festival has been held consecutively for ten years. Other things to do in the region include shopping at The Canal Street Antique Mall and visiting numerous local hangouts like pubs, cafes, and lounges.

Overall, this district is a vibrant urban center with successful origins in businesses of various natures. The rush of immigrants to the city at the turn of the century proved a great situation for the budding commercial metropolitan. These circumstances have turned the area into a bustling and fruitful economy.

For a comprehensive market analysis of your rental property, please contact us today.

Lowell
The birthplace of the American Industrial Revolution and home to historic riverside mills, the city now boasts a walkable downtown area, numerous historic properties, and relatively affordable housing prices. Located to the northwest of Boston along the confluence of the Merrimack and Concord rivers, Lowell is the fourth-largest city in Massachusetts.Today, employment in the area includes a mix of blue and white-collar occupations, with many employment opportunities available in software, sales, service, and healthcare sectors. Residents of the area on average only commute 25 minutes to work each day.

Schools

Education plays a key role in the city as Lowell supports the 14,000 students in its Public Schools and is also the home to UMass Lowell and Middlesex Community College. For families with school age and teenage children, a range of twenty-four public K-8 schools serve Lowell residents. Several private institutions provide alternative educational options. The well-regarded Lowell High School, founded in 1841, serves 3,000 students and has educated generations of Lowell’s diverse student body. Lowell High graduates include beat writer Jack Kerouac, and Helen Battles Sawyer Hogg, the world renowned and pioneering female astronomer.

The University of Massachusetts – Lowell is the fifth largest university in the state. Located along the Merrimack River, the university has highly ranked programs in engineering, criminal justice, science, and technology. Lowell is also home to Middlesex Community College, the state’s second largest Associate’s college.

Transportation

Access to all areas of Boston’s northern suburbs, as well as New Hampshire, is made easy by Lowell’s position at the intersection of I-495 and Rte. 3 (Northern Expressway) and quick access to I-93. In addition, Lowell has its own Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority (MBTA) commuter rail line station, the Gallagher Transportation Terminal, which provides MBTA commuter train service into Boston’s North Station in 45 minutes. The Great Lowell transportation system also provides bus service throughout Lowell and neighboring towns.

Housing Options

The current median home value for the area as $265,700. The area’s median rental price is $1,490 per month. The housing market in the city is on the rise, with property values expected to increase 3-4% in the coming years. The eastern and southwestern parts of the city host more expensive housing options with some of the city’s most charming historical homes in the Belvidere, Oaklands, and Highlands neighborhoods. Overall, the area is more affordable than most of the Boston Metro area and is conveniently located for commuting

History, Community, and Recreation

In the 1820s, industrialist developers were originally drawn to this formerly agricultural area for its riverfront location. The river made the area a viable location for textile manufacturing and by 1850 the region was an epicenter of urban manufacturing.

Today, Diversity is one of Lowell’s major strengths and a distinct advantage of living in the area—the city’s residents include White, Asian, and Hispanic groups, and migration of other ethnic groups to the area dates back to its days as a booming industrial capital. Data collected by the Census Bureau shows that 22.3% of adults have a Bachelor’s degree or higher, making the city’s population fairly educated. The city is a mix of all income levels, contributing to the diversity of the region.

A large Cambodian population accounts for a majority of the city’s diversity and is the second largest Cambodian population in America. Migration of refugees in the 1970s brought many Cambodians to the city. The up-and-coming Little Cambodia business district is the best place to sample authentic Khmer cuisine. Popular dishes with locals include beef loc lac, a marinated and seared beef dish, and a Cambodian version of spicy calamari called ye-heu bumporng. Shops in the area also offer traditional Cambodian snacks and homemade beef jerky.

In addition to the cuisine offered in Little Cambodia, the downtown area has a growing café and restaurant scene. Caffeine-fiends can be found at Brew’d Awakening Coffeehouse, a fair-trade coffee shop with a buzzing arts scene. The menu at Cobblestones of Lowell includes classic American fare such as burgers and mac and cheese. During the summer, many restaurants and bars in the downtown area open patios for visitors to enjoy people watching and the historic scenery in this compact city center.

The local National Historical Park is comprised of multiple sites across the city, all of which pertain to the city’s industrial mill era. Boott Cotton Mill and Museum features a working industrial weaving loom and offers visitors the chance to experience the noise and action of the factory in its prime. The Pawtucket Dam and Gatehouse is home to the largest power canal system in the country. Tours of the park are offered on a trolley and via boat, where visitors can enjoy the charming architecture along scenic canals.

The city hosts many festivals and events throughout the year, including a winter carnival, a film festival, and a Jack Kerouac festival to honor the writer, who was born in the area in 1922. In July, a three-day free folk festival is hosted in the downtown area, bringing thousands of visitors to enjoy music, dancing, crafts, and street food. The festival is the longest running free folk festival in the country and offers performances on six stages.

Apart from the historical and cultural activities available in the city, the area also offers outdoor recreation options for those looking for fresh air. The Lowell-Dracut-Tyngsboro State Forest measures over 1,000 acres and is located immediately northwest of the city. Visitors to the forest can hike, bike, or sometimes ski, across various trails amid the park’s scenic landscape. There are also ponds and wetlands in the area that are open to boats and fishing.

Located only 25 miles from Boston and accessibly connected by highway and train lines, Lowell is an ideal place to live for those looking to commute to work. In addition to its convenient location, the city offers appealing cultural activities and historic charm. With affordable property values that are on the rise, the city is becoming one of the most active real estate markets in Massachusetts.

For a comprehensive market analysis of your rental property, please contact us today.

Methuen
Methuen is in northern Essex County, Massachusetts on the NH border and boasts a population of over 47,000 with a distinctively small-town feeling. Methuen dates back to 1642 when the area first saw European settlement. It became an incorporated town in 1726. With its convenient location in between Boston and southern New Hampshire, Methuen offers plenty of public transportation options, making it a good place to consider when you’re in the market for housing near Boston. The town includes a diverse population including several Central American and Caribbean Hispanic populations, as well as an Eastern Orthodox monastery. The town sponsors several events that celebrate diversity throughout the year.

Schools

Methuen has four K-8 public grammar schools, including a Comprehensive Grammar schools that serves English language learners. Methuen High has 1,800 students, of whom 38% are minority, and features a 13-1 pupil-teacher ratio. Methuen High School offers 17 AP Courses. About 28 percent of the population has a college degree, and 88 percent of the population graduated from high school and several college and university systems offering nearby opportunities.

Transportation

Interstate 93 offers a quick drive to and from Boston as well as access to NH, while I-495 leads to Metro West and north shore communities. The Merrimack Valley Regional Transit Authority offers convenient bus service to many surrounding cities and towns including stops at train stations that offer transport to Boston. Average commute times are about 30 minutes.

Housing Options

This Massachusetts city enjoys a median income of $68,587 as of 2017, a higher income than the national average and about on the same level as most of the region. The local job market has increased by 2.26 percent since 2017 and is expected to keep growing with increased commercial development. A majority of the new jobs that became available included management, business and financial, and computer and math-related positions, with higher-income job growth expected to continue to grow.

Median sales prices in early 2018 were $303,000, and there were home types of many varieties to choose from. Colonial, garrison and split-level homes are among some of the most popular styles, with most having at least three bedrooms and two baths. New construction homes have also become very popular, most in newer developments with a lot of green space. Methuen has a low crime rate, which makes it an ideal place to raise a family.

Homes for rent average $1975 per month. Condos and apartments created from the conversion of older homes are among some of the most popular rental options. Spacious floor plans and upgraded amenities are among some of the best features of these rental options.

History, Community, and Recreation

Many of Methuen’s neighborhoods saw a lot of development with the rise of textile mills, hat and shoe factories along the Spicket River during the 1800’s during a period of high industrial growth. The Searles Tenney Nevins Historic District was established by the city in 1992 to help preserve the historic buildings that made up an important part of Methuen’s development

Today, this New England town enjoys a wealth of interesting landmarks that are worthy of attention. Forest Lake is a 55-acre pond perfect for swimming, canoeing, and fishing that is a perfect destination during the summer. Another outdoor attraction of interest to locals is the Methuen Rail Trail, which connects to trails in Lawrence and Salem, NH. One of the effects of having this trail system is a regional bike path that residents will find most convenient and minimize the effects on the environment from car traffic.

The Methuen Memorial Music Hall hosts musical events on a regular basis that are known throughout the region. It is perhaps most well-known for its Great Organ, which is one of the largest pipe organs in use in the area. This organ helps make it easier for performers to play treasured classical pieces.

Other key historical buildings include the Methuen Water Works building and the Nevins Memorial Library, which stand out as major tributes to the city’s past. The Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals has a large rescue and adoption facility here. Part of the MSPCA facility includes a cemetery for pets.

For a comprehensive market analysis of your rental property, please contact us today.

North Andover
North Andover is a quintessential New England community that is situated in northeastern Massachusetts less than 30 miles from Boston. First settled in 1644, the town was officially incorporated in 1855 and is considered to be one of the most peaceful residential communities in the state. Most of the local residents hold college degrees and work in the technical, health care and manufacturing industries. The majority of the town’s residents are of English, Irish and Italian descent, but there are also Asian, Hispanic and African-American residents that make up part of the local population.

Education

North Andover Public Schools serve 4,795 students. Children can receive their education by attending one of the towns six (6) K-8 schools. North Andover High School serves 1,400 students and performs well in state performance exams. Merrimack College is located in North Andover and offer degree programs that can prepare students for many exciting and rewarding career fields.

Transportation

North Andover is minutes from Interstate 495 and I-93, allowing easy access to Boston and Southern New Hampshire. Residents are minutes from the Andover MBTA train service leading to Boston’s North Station. The town is also served by the Merrimack Regional Transit Authority, which oversees the local public bus service. Certain local bus routes connect to commuter rail trains that travel to more distant communities throughout the area.

Housing Options

Many of the town’s homes were designed with classic Colonial architectural styles to add to the area’s quaint appeal. Large family homes as well as smaller abodes for singles and couples can be found in many parts of the town. As of February 2018, the median home value in North Andover is $490,600 with an average listing price of $500,000. Rental homes can be found in the range of $1,100 to $2,000 per month.

History, Community and Recreation

North Andover offers a broad array of outdoor activities. Several hiking and biking trails that pass by unspoiled wilderness areas can be found within the Weir Hill Reservation. Lake Cochichewick is the perfect place to go boating or fishing on a warm day. More trails and camping areas along with a freshwater swimming beach make up large portions of Harold Parker State Forest. The beautiful gardens found at the Stevens-Coolidge Place continuously draw many visitors. For a bit of history, residents can journey to the Col. John Osgood House, which dates back to the 18th century. Turtle Lane Maple Farm produces pure Massachusetts maple syrup and can be toured by visitors.

LaserCraze is an entertainment complex that features laser tag, a bounce area and other recreation apparatuses for children. Smolak Farms is known for its delicious cider donuts, agricultural exhibits and arts and crafts shows. The Rogers Center for the Arts regularly features Merrimack Valley Philharmonic Pops concerts as well as other musical and theatrical performances.

Many of the town’s restaurants serve delicious seafood and classic American edibles as well as dishes inspired by traditional Asian cuisine.

For a comprehensive market analysis of your rental property, please contact us today.

Tewksbury
If you want to live in the northern Boston suburbs, then the small town of Tewksbury may be your ideal location. Its 30,000 residents are considered to be part of the Greater Lowell metropolitan district.Tewksbury was first settled in 1637 and was officially incorporated in 1734 from Billerica. It is named after the town of Tewkesbury, England. The town is located about 19 miles (31 km) north-northwest of Boston. Businesses along Main Street create a small commercial district. Most residents of this Lowell suburb are employed in Boston or nearby suburbs and can drive to work in less than 30 minutes.

Schools

With a high school, two junior high schools, and four elementary schools, this town has a strong education system that serves nearly 3,700 students. The new Tewksbury HS opened in 2012 at a cost of $65 MM and serves approximately 1,300 students and has an 18:1 student teacher ratio.

Transportation

Residents of Tewksbury are minutes from I-495, I-93 and Rte. 3 (Northern Expressway) providing quick access to Boston, tech corridors on 128 and I-495, and towns in southern NH. Commuters can use both the Lowell and Haverhill MBTA line to reach Boston’s North Station.

Housing Options

The median income for Tewksbury residents is $108,000 per year; the per capita income is about $41,000 annually. This lovely community is relatively affluent with the median home value at $360,000. Apartment rental for a one-bedroom unit runs between $1,500 and $2,000 per month. Housing is only slightly more expensive in Tewksbury than in other parts of the Bay State. If you want a single-family dwelling, you can expect the mean price to be just under $600,000. Condos and townhouses run a little less than $500,000 on average. A structure with five or more units may cost each resident between $300,000 and $400,000. The education level of Tewksbury citizens is substantially higher than the typical US community, as 33.03% of adults in Tewksbury have at least a bachelor’s degree.

History, Community and Recreation

Tewksbury offers multiple entertainment options for families. You may enjoy an occasional night of bowling at Wamesit lanes. If you take your children to Merrimack Valley Pavilion, they can play in the arcade, but you may need a reservation for laser tag. When the kids are ready for a break, you can buy them pizza or ice cream and watch people play mini golf.

For a comprehensive market analysis of your rental property, please contact us today.

Neighborhoods We Serve

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